Yogi योगी Insight (part 3 in a series)

If you are coming here for the first time, you have entered part 3 in a series about aspiring and experienced yogis’ journeys. I hope that you enjoy it and follow along. Namaste!

I heard through the yoga grapevine at CorePower that Jenn was a great teacher and I had spoken with her a few times at the front desk. One evening, I decided to take her C2 class and the rest is history! She became one of my favorite instructors, a friend, a mentor, and one of the leaders of my Power Yoga Teacher Training (PYTT) program.

Yogi: Jenn Price
Studio: CorePower Yoga, Fairfax

Q: Who or what influenced you to take up yoga?
A: I had just moved back to the east coast. I was at home transitioning from a corporate job to being a new mom. Once I was able to have some free time I started attending a yoga studio within walking distance of my house. I was looking to get back into a physical activity and wanted an hour of time to myself. I started off with Hatha yoga. I liked it because it felt really good on my postpartum body. I had always been very athletic and the class made me feel like I was accomplishing something. I immediately found myself wanting to go back more and more. I liked doing something just for myself. Later on, I took a Power Vinyasa class led by Jaimis Huff. It was the first Power Vinyasa class I had ever taken and it knocked me off of my *ass! I was like that does not qualify as yoga! I didn’t return to her class for a long time. Jaimis ended up being one of my biggest mentors and a friend that I still reach out to today for guidance.

Q: How long have you been practicing yoga?
A: I took my very first yoga class in February 2015 — the Hatha yoga class.

Q: What aspect of practicing yoga are you most passionate about?
A: I love the challenge of arm balances, backbends and inversions. For me, one of the juicy detoxifying aspects is to be able to slow down and treat myself inside and out.

Q: How long have you been teaching yoga?
A: Since April 2016. I did my Teacher Training at CorePower, but I had never practiced at CorePower before I did Teacher Training there. I reached out to the CorePower corporate office in Denver to inquire about training opportunities. I was connected with Liv, the studio manager at the time. The first class I took at CorePower was Liv’s C2 class. I loved that CPY Teacher Training was intensive. CPY’s programs are unique because the number of classes they require is definitely a lot heavier than other places.

Q: What is your mission as a yoga teacher?
A: I hope that everyone leaves with a deeper sense of connection to themselves. I want people to feel gratitude for who they are and that they are supported. I want my classes to be inspiring so that people feel energized and a sense of accomplishment, but more importantly, awareness for how truly strong they are. I know my classes provide physical challenges, but it’s also about breaking down mental walls that we create for ourselves and thinking in our heads that we can’t do something.

Q: What aspect of teaching yoga are you most passionate about?
A: It’s similar to what I’m passionate about in my practice — striving to teach self-love through an understanding of what happens on our mat, what we can and cannot do and how that translates in our life. I want people to know that they can come to the mat as they are raw, broken and messy and that there are no expectations. I want them to learn through their yoga practice that the love for themselves if it’s not already there, can grow from an awareness of who they are, what they want to be — experience growth on their mat.

Q: What is most challenging for you as a teacher?
A: The constant pressure I put on myself to create innovative sequences that continue to turn it up and take it to the next level for students is a challenge. I realize that I put that pressure on myself. It’s the same as in my own practice — I have expectations of what I want to do and I’m always having to remind myself that it’s not about the postures.

Q: What is most fulfilling for you as a teacher?
A: The friendships and connections that I have made with students. It’s important that I always teach from my heart and what feels right for my body. It’s a big chance you take when you put something like yoga that is sacred and personal to you and share it, hoping that others feel the same. The CPY community has been so accepting and supportive of me and my teaching — embracing my sequences and my mentality of yoga off the mat. Knowing that students resonate with what I teach and the life lessons that I share is awesome! It’s what links us together and is the whole point of yoga.

Q: How do you come up with your themes/intentions? Your sequences?
A: My themes are always related to something that is going on in my life or a conversation that I had recently with someone in my class, a friend or family member. It’s important to me that the themes I share are authentic so that I’m connected to what I say. I think that’s how it translates to something genuine and more importantly, impactful. Someone recently commented to me that it always seems like I am speaking from my heart. I replied I am. I hope to inspire my students, and if I’m sharing personal stories of what’s going on in my life I’m allowing the energy of our class to uplift me in return — it’s a reciprocity, coming full circle.

In regard to sequences, I always strive to pick an area of practice that allows students of all levels to have something to work on when they show up to take a class. It can be a focus on a specific part of the body, a particular part of yoga like backbends, inversions Ayurveda (holistic healing), or the moon cycle. Sometimes it can be based on one of my student’s requests — if they have something specific they really want to work on. At the end of the day when you come to my class, you know that you are going to get a good flow, some drills to strengthen for arm balances and inversions.

Q: What is some advice you have for a new yoga instructor?
A: Always teach to what feels right in your body and what speaks/radiates from your own heart. Also, try not to fall into the teacher’s curse of losing sight of your own practice. Make time to stay committed to your practice. It doesn’t have to be a studio class — it can be cultivating a home or self-practice. Keep some time sacred for yourself!

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