Beyond the Physical

Uma Alexandra Beepat

My friend Tim from yoga class who follows my blog said, “I know a person who would be great for you to interview! Her name is Uma Alexandra Beepat. She is a Master Healer, owner of the Lotus Wellness Center, and an author. She’s incredible!” Given Tim’s enthusiasm and recommendation, how could I not reach out to Uma? No matter what your beliefs, I hope you keep an open mind and enjoy her interview.

Q: What is a master healer?
A: A master healer is someone who has completed over 10,000 sessions and is certified in several different methods of healing, thereby increasing their experience and knowledge in healing.

Q: Who or what inspired you to become a master healer?
A: The funny thing is I didn’t set out to become a master healer; it happened by way of me working! Over 10 years of working with clients, I am nearing my 10,000 mark, and that standard is accurate. I am more aware of healing issues and what people sometimes need before they even tell me their issues.

Q: What is your greatest reward being a master healer?
A: My greatest reward is knowing how many people I have helped to heal and move forward to live better lives.

Q: What is your greatest challenge being a master healer?
A: My greatest challenge is seeing people suffer unnecessarily when there are healing choices available to them. While healing is not a cure-all or replacement for traditional medicine, it can be a great addition to the treatment of a person using western medicine.

Q: What is the most common shared area that you feel people need life improvement?
A: The most common shared perception is the lack of money or the scarcity of it and therefore, the mindset that ensues. When we live in lack, we can only see the world from a small lens, so everything seems insufficient. There is a lot of talk about what you can’t do or can’t have. I am working to change this perception because once that happens, your world expands and you can go on to live a healthier and happier life full of abundance.

Q: Why did you open Lotus Wellness Center, and what is your long-term goal for the center?  
A: I opened Lotus Wellness Center to provide a safe place for people who need healing and wanted to further their spiritual and emotional growth. After we complete high school/college, there are little resources or community available to people to bond, connect, or continue life learning. Lotus was and is meant to address that concern. My long-term goal is to expand and have a Lotus Wellness Center in every town and state so that everyone has a place to go when they need it.

Q: You have an impressive list of certifications, having earned more than 40! Is there any certification you want to achieve that you have not already?
A: Thank you! I am a student at heart, and most of my certifications were for my benefit, not necessarily to share professionally. Currently, I am working on becoming a certified medium as my shift in my work has turned to spirituality and spiritual communication. I am in a program that is a lengthy testing process and consists of 30 lessons. It has been an interesting road; the healing that comes from this type of work is indescribable.

Q: What is your favorite area of certification? 
A: My favorite area of certification is Access Consciousness. I currently offer two techniques under this modality. They are very effective in changing people’s mindsets and lives.

Q: What is your most valued tool in your “toolbox”? 
A: Access Bars because it changes your belief systems and limiting thoughts without you having to do anything! It’s automatic, it’s quick, and it’s noticeable! [NOTE: Access Bars are 32 bars of energy that run through and around your head that connect to different aspects of your life. Examples: creativity, control, communication, healing, kindness/gratitude/peace, etc.]

Q: Is there anything else you would like to share with my readers?
A: Yes! I am also the proud co-owner of spiritual retreats with my partner Rob Pritchard. We have a spiritual retreat coming up in October that I hope your readers can join us for called The Awakened Life Retreat. We also have an annual New Year, New You workshop in January! I love retreat work because it brings a deeper dive into healing and reflection that regular appointments cannot.

Uma’s Background: owner of Lotus Wellness Center, spiritual teacher, psychic and spiritual medium, master energy healer, consciousness speaker, and author of The Awakened Life (available through Amazon). Uma’s designation of master healer comes from her experience training for over 10 years consistently in metaphysics education and earning 40 certifications (and counting)! Also, she has personally worked on over 10,000 clients.

Fitness Is in My Genes

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I was reflecting on the origins of Gal on the Go. Who inspired me to change and live a more active and healthful existence? I was fixated on coming up with a woman in my life; then it dawned on me; it’s my Uncle Joe!!!!

Ever since I was a little girl, I was aware of my Uncle Joe’s commanding presence and dedication to fitness. However, I didn’t realize the impact his healthy lifestyle had on my mindset. In my teens and college years, I was preoccupied with navigating my life. It wasn’t until I was an adult that I realized the power of his influence by way of example through his fitness work ethic.

Today, at age 75, my uncle could put many 20 somethings to shame! I was curious about how 61 years of daily fitness became a part of his life. So, I picked up the phone, called him, and had a lengthy heartfelt discussion with him.

The following is part of our conversation. I hope you find it insightful and inspirational…

Q: How old were you when you first started working out?
A: 14; I was a freshman in high school.

Q: Who or what influenced you to start exercising?
A: You know, we come from a big family. I didn’t have much growing up, and I didn’t know anything about exercise. One day, Uncle Phil and his son came to our house. They lived four doors down on the same side of the street. Phil was my favorite uncle. Phil told my father that he joined this health club and was working out, and my cousin made a muscle, a bicep. I looked at it like wow! Uncle Phil talked my father into allowing me to join the gym with my cousin, who was already a member.

I believe Uncle Phil paid for my first year — it was around $50 for a one-year membership back then. At that time in the 1950s, I didn’t even know what weight training was. I never heard of it. I didn’t know anybody who was lifting weights. I just knew my cousin’s muscles looked huge. I didn’t know how he got them.

As I got older, I added cardio to my weight lifting regiment because heart problems run in my father’s side of the family. There were five boys, and all of them died of heart issues. I felt doing cardiovascular exercises on a regular basis would help to minimize my chance of having a heart attack or something.

Q: What was the first gym you ever belonged to?
A: American Health Studio. It was a bodybuilding place — strictly weight training. Back in the 1950s, they didn’t have an indoor track, and all the other stuff gyms have today. It was just bodybuilding. There were two sides to the gym; one for competitive members, and another for beginners. We lifted on the non-competitive side, and I was grateful because when you start as a kid, you’re benching like 75 pounds. If I had watched the guys on the competitive side, I would have been intimidated by how much they lifted.

Q: How many gyms have you belonged to in 61 years?
A: At least 13. The average life span of a gym is usually seven to eight years. There’s so much competition. I belong to two gyms at a time for a challenge and change of pace, you know, different scenery. I was given the keys to several gyms over the years because the owners respected me. So I was able to work out any time I wanted, even on days when the gym was closed, like on Christmas. I prefer family-owned gyms because I feel that when you go to a smaller gym, you’re never among strangers. When you walk into a large commercial gym where there are 500+ members, it’s not the same. At smaller gyms, you get to know everybody, and it’s more personal.

Back in the day, there were very few gyms; now there is one every two blocks. Also, years ago, you would never see a woman in the gym. In the 1960s, I saw some women at the gym, but they were using vibration machines. I never saw them lifting weights. In the 1980s, I saw a few women weight training. Now I go to the Lockport YMCA, and there are an equal number of women, if not more women than men strength training.

Q: How many times a week did you go to the gym when you started in your teens?
A: About three times a week at the most. It was hard when I was younger because I didn’t have a car. I didn’t get my driver’s license until I was 26, so for years, I had to take a bus to the gym. In the beginning, there were periods when I would take a few weeks off from working out, but then I always returned. I think the periods of rest were good for me. When you go back, even though it’s challenging to start up again, you get stronger and stronger, because your body is rested.

One time, for some reason I hadn’t worked out for a long time because I was very sick. When I returned to lifting, it was tough for me to get back into shape. I swore that I was going to make sure I was disciplined. I had gained some weight, and I didn’t like it. It took a lot of effort for me to get down to the weight that was best for me. I vowed that I was never going to put myself through that again, and I never did. For more than 40 years, I’ve been very consistent.

I felt so good lifting. As I became stronger, I gained confidence. I had a newfound realization. When you are a freshman in high school, guys pick on you, but as I grew stronger and stronger, no one would bother me. I went to school at Canisius where kids had cars at age 16 and came from families with lots of money. I didn’t have any money, you know, I was the second eldest of eight kids from a family on the west side. The only thing I had to give my friends was protection from other kids. They counted on me if they were having trouble to solve their problems.

I’m not proud of this, but one day I went to school on a Saturday and hit a kid because he was picking on a friend of mine. A friend drove me. I went to school, knocked on the door, and told the kid to come out. He was a year ahead of me. He wouldn’t come out, but I kept knocking. Finally, he came out, and I said something like I heard you’re picking on my buddy Tom. I hit the kid and the next thing you know, we were in a priest’s office. The priest punched me with his knuckle right in my chest cavity. I couldn’t breathe. He told me to get out of school. I figured I deserved it. I never got into further trouble.

Q: How many times a week do you work out now?
A: Seven days a week. Every other day I go to a gym. I belong to two gyms and alternate between them. On my “off days,” I work out at home briefly in the morning and then at night. When I work out at home, I use light weights and walk on the treadmill. Every day, in the early morning I warm up at home for about 20 minutes with light weights, then I go to the gym for two and a half hours and do a mix of cardio, free weights and some of the weight machines, and then at night I do another 20-minute light workout at home. I like exercising in the morning because it sets the tone for the day. I can commit to other projects the rest of the day and not feel resentful if I didn’t get my workout in.

Q: What are some changes you have experienced since you started weight lifting in your teens?
A: When I was younger, I thought a true man doesn’t work out on machines. He uses free weights, but as I have gotten older, I see things differently. If they didn’t have machines at gyms now, I probably wouldn’t be able to get much of a workout. Years ago I wouldn’t join a gym unless they had over 100-pound dumbbells because I had already mastered the hundreds and I could do many reps with a 100. Now, I go to a gym, and the first thing I ask is, do you have anything lighter? I’m at the other end of the rack now.

When I was in my 20s until about age 48, I used to lift weights, run five miles a day in Delaware Park, and play basketball. I liked to mix things up. I didn’t listen to my body. I had the “no pain, no gain” mentality. It was the philosophy at that time. I learned that there’s a difference between pain and discomfort. If your body is in pain that’s a problem, but sometimes your ego gets in the way, and you continue to bench press and exercise too intensely; that’s not good.

Over the years, I heard about a lot of the bodybuilders I knew who were not doing so well. Some of them were taking things over a period of time and paid the price. I never took anything but Creatine and Protein. Unfortunately, I knew people who took things and committed suicide — they would go into rages. At one point, there was a cleaning chemical called Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO) that some guys used to put on their skin to absorb because they thought it helped with the pain.

Q: What is your favorite weight exercise?
A: French curls, also known as tricep extensions. I think because people always made positive comments about my arms. I used to curl 175 pounds.

Q: What impact has exercise had in your life and in what way?
A: It has kept me healthy. I have only taken off from work a few days ever my whole life. Also, I was very shy and lacked confidence. It took a while, but weight training made me feel like I was on equal footing with others.

When I became a school teacher, I ran a weight training program for elementary and high school kids. I would show up early, around 7 a.m., and we would work out for an hour or so a couple of times a week. An assistant principal asked me to do it; the board of education didn’t want it for insurance reasons, but the assistant principal still gave me the OK to do it. One of my students, Mike Pariso, became a competitive bodybuilder on a national level and is known as the “Man of Steel.”

Over the years, people nicknamed me Jack LaLanne. They still call me that to this day. I consider it a compliment. Jack did a lot for fitness — he brought it into our homes in the 1950s. He did nothing but good for healthy living and bodybuilding.

Q: Who is your idol?
A: My son Joey. I say that because of all he went through. He never once lamented or felt pity for himself. He was determined to fight. I admire that kid; he’s something. (Quick Background: Joey is my cousin, who is my age and the son of my Uncle Joe. A few years ago, with no warning, he was diagnosed with stage 3 colon cancer, underwent drastic surgery, fought for his life, and is doing great today.)

Q: What advice would you give others?
A: The biggest thing I tell people is to listen to their body. You can remain uninjured by listening to the little signals your body sends you — this is too much; you don’t need to do this; rest, etc. There’s a difference between being sore the next day, and hearing tears as you do exercises. If you listen to your body, you can continue for many many years.

I don’t see why you can’t keep exercising, even in modified form for decades. My buddy Herbie, a retired police officer, is in his early 80s. We used to work out together back in the day at Turner’s gymnasium, a gymnastics place that had weights. Herbie still tries to exercise and seems to enjoy it. His body is broken down, but his will is strong! I have always looked forward to working out. As long as I can retain that enthusiasm, I’ll continue to work out. I don’t see it waning. I sometimes wonder what would have happened if I didn’t get into fitness and develop confidence. I credit weight lifting with a lot. I enjoy it immensely and hope that I can continue to do it for years and years.

___________

[The end of our conversation… Listen, Kimmy, you made my day. I love ya. Bye, dear.]
My uncle rocks!!!! ❤️

A main goal of Gal on the Go is to motivate people to lead active fearless lives. I hope that you have an Uncle Joe in your life who positively influenced you or that you are an inspiration to someone else!

Yogi योगी Insight (part 13 in a series)

If you are coming here for the first time, you have entered part 13 in an interview series with aspiring and experienced yogis called Yogi Insight. I hope that you enjoy each person’s shared journey. Namaste!

I first learned about Homegrown Power Yoga when I was visiting a mom-and-pop coffee shop next door and noticed the studio. Curious, I checked out Homegrown’s website and classes online and about a week later wondered in with my friend Christina to try a class. It was an amazing hot yoga flow led by Alison, the owner. The experience made such a positive impact on me, that I became a member.

Alison has a unique way of leading a challenging sequence with true deep mindful reflection throughout the class. She is authentic to her belief that “yoga is for every single body. Whatever apprehension you may have, show up — show up and do what you can, and let the rest be gone.”

Yogi: Alison Adams, founder and teacher
Studio: Homegrown Power Yoga

Alison Adams

Q: How long have you been practicing yoga?
A: It’s very seldom that I count the years. On and off since my early 20s and then more continuously in the last 15 years as a regular practice.

Who or what influenced you to take up yoga?
A: Initially I had a dance teacher that incorporated yoga as part of our warm up, and I didn’t even know we were practicing yoga. I thought it was really cool — that’s why when I started I was in my 20s and didn’t know it was yoga. Later, when I went to a yoga class, I was like I’ve done this before!!!! I recognize all of these movements! I was doing yoga and didn’t know it! That was the start; it wasn’t super direct. I bounced around in different yoga classes, going wherever I could find a class because it wasn’t popular back then. It became a daily practice when I lived in Rochester, and I started practicing at Breathe Yoga with Cyndi Weis, an owner of the studio. That’s where I did my first 40 days and got involved with the Baptiste practice and started a daily practice. That was probably the biggest influence on me making it a constant practice.

Q: What aspect of practicing yoga do you like the most and why?
A: The practice has radically transformed who I am — it’s really hard for me to see the practice as something other than a lifestyle. For me, it’s not I do these things, and this is why I practice. It’s a way of being. It has become a system for my life to operate. It has given me the ability and ease to be in my life 100% — the ability for me to self-reflect, self-aware, take accountability and responsibility for how I show up in the world.

Q: What is your favorite style of yoga class to take and why?
A: I have taught Baptiste yoga for the past 10 years. Baron and the Baptiste yoga practice have clearly had a huge influence on who I am, and will always be my practice.

Q: Why did you open a yoga studio?
A: I genuinely love teaching. There was a natural progression for me to want to cultivate and build an environment that was closer to a community that was relatable to the experiences that I wanted to put in. The studio is named Homegrown because I wanted to teach in the place where I live, the community where I am — the influence of yoga impacting every part of my life. I have people like my neighbors, people from the ballet studio where my kids go, people from the grocery store I shop at — it’s a hub and that impacts and spreads out to the community. It’s a lot of the reason why I opened up the studio here. When I was teaching I was doing it in DC and Bethesda — more outside of my community which was fine, but I wanted to be more localized and have a more saturated impact.

Q: What excites you the most about owning the studio?
A: It’s interesting and surprising — some things have caught me from left field where people are bringing people in, practicing regularly and then emerging as teachers. And I’m like whoa, that happened, I didn’t foresee it coming! Andy just came back from Level 1 training. He had been practicing with me for a year. He was like, “I’m going to do it! I’m going to Level 1. I’m going to be a teacher!” I was like what!?! That’s the stuff that you have no idea when you start teaching a class to one person who walks in the door how the seeds are going to land. What is going to grow from the seeds — that’s the piece that I wake up every morning and feel the work I do really matters, and it makes me show up and contribute in that way.

Q: What has been a challenge for you as a studio owner?
A: Maintaining the integrity of the practice of yoga and the integrity of the practice of business and merging the two so that they can co-exist. They are two very exclusive worlds unless you bring them both mindfully and consciously into the world of the teachers. It’s not a hardship, but marrying the two with intent to be the integrity of both of the worlds.

Q: Some studios use music in class and some do not. You do you not. Why?
A: I don’t want to make a comparison; I can only speak to how I created this space at Homegrown. It’s very intentional so that when you’re in your practice space, the only thing you are actually in fact sharing is your own experience. It gives you the opportunity to be 100% in your body, in your mind, without the pull of external information. We live in a world that bombards us with information, and we’re at a time of crisis where we need to learn to pull ourselves out, we need to know how to unplug, turn things off — this becomes sacred.

Q: What advice would you give to a new yoga teacher?
A: Be respectful to where your teachings are from. Stay close to the source, and present your teachings with a clear understanding and intention. Basically, don’t go making stuff up, focus and get really good!

Yogi योगी Insight (part 12 in a series)

If you are coming here for the first time, you have entered part 12 in an interview series with aspiring and experienced yogis called Yogi Insight. I hope that you enjoy each person’s shared journey. Namaste!

I met Dan through an Intro to Arm Balance Workshop he taught at Fierce Om, where I work. During the workshop, he shared great breathing and warm-up exercises along with tips for breaking down the arm balance poses. He kindly agreed to stay after the event for an interview.

Dan Castan

Dan likes to live life on the edge! 😉

Yogi: Dan Castan
Studio: Dan Castan Yoga

Q: How long have you been practicing yoga?
A: Since freshmen year of college. I thought I was going to an easy stretching class to supplement my long-distance running, but it was more than I expected and I developed a love for yoga. I took four years of Vinyasa, Hatha, Ashtanga and Bikram Yoga, then decided to pursue my 200-hour teacher training in Virginia Beach where I was going to college.

Q: What aspect of practicing yoga do you like the most and why?
A: I like being able to physically and mentally challenge myself. Finding the edge where I am at on a given day and then pushing myself physically and mentally. It feels empowering to me!

Q: Which is your favorite yoga style to practice?
A: The first yoga style I practiced was Hatha, but more of an athletic Hatah style because of my instructor’s background at the time. From there, I went on to take Vinyasa classes, which I liked a lot, especially as a long-distance runner, the stretching and strengthening aspects were great. Then I took Ashtanga, which helped me get into a meditative state. It (Ashtanga) is now my favorite style.

Q: What is your favorite posture and why?
A: Bakasana (crane pose) because it was my intro pose to arm balances. Being able to fly, balance on my hands in Bakasana was special to me because I felt empowered the first time I achieved it. I thought this is awesome!

Q: How long have you been teaching yoga?
A: I have been teaching yoga for 10 years. I started in a studio setting teaching group classes. Now, I do private sessions and semi-private sessions with 3-4 people and lead workshops. I help people improve their form by teaching them things like how to shift their weight and gracefully get into/achieve poses.

Q: What aspect of teaching yoga do you like the most and why?
A: I love seeing my students progress, seeing the aha moments on their face when they get postures and reach milestones. I love seeing them grow as students.

Q: As a male instructor, do you feel your teaching style is different?
A: Yes, but only because of my athletic background in running and cross-training. I think my style of teaching incorporates more upper body poses. I focus on those because I have found that the upper body postures are beneficial with the progression of inversions and arm balances.

Q: What advice would you give to a new yoga teacher?
A: Keep it simple. When I first started teaching, I tried to give every single alignment for a posture, and that’s the quickest way you can mentally burn out a student.

Q: What are the different kinds of workshops you teach?
A: Arm balances rate number one for me because, through my personal practice, arm balances opened up a whole different aspect. They help to improve your inversions and transitions — instead of jumping back I started to flow back. The arm balances workshop is my favorite to teach because of that. Second would be the transitions workshop — jump backs, jump throughs. My practice became more playful when I started working hard on the transitions. I may offer a workshop down the road in 2020 on inversions like shoulderstands, headstands. I’m currently working on improving mine.

As I have taught and gotten deeper into the practice of yoga, the biggest thing I have learned is how to slow down and pay attention. Also, I have gained more self-confidence in my body’s ability to do things physically, which in turn has helped mentally.

#yearofyou

#yearofyou

Before the official start of 2019, I created the hashtag yearofyou and challenged you to invest in yourself this year through healthy activities and events. Trying to lead by example, I’ll share my life experience and the progress on my goals along the way.

Life Experience Share: A friend recently asked me, how do you stay committed to exercise and motivated? My response, set time aside for yourself every day whether it’s 5 minutes, 60 minutes, or whatever and schedule it on your calendar like an appointment. You are more likely to commit to a workout if you treat it like an appointment that you cannot cancel without penalty. If you have a doctor appointment, you take it seriously and don’t skip it. Same goes for self-care time. If you need a mental health recharge, take some quiet time and meditate or listen to music that fills your soul. If you need a physical release, take a yoga class, go for a run, whatever activity challenges you while you are doing it, but then afterward makes you feel fulfilled. My friend shared that she does well for a few days or weeks, goes out and eats/drinks too much, and then feels like all her efforts were for nothing, so she throws in the towel altogether. My advice to her, DON’T GIVE UP! YOU ARE NOT ALONE! This is one of the most common reactions people have when they go off track. If this happens, you need to switch your mindset from self-sabotage that all your workouts were for nothing to it’s alright, I had some indulgences that everyone is entitled to, and I will get back on track! If you do or think in extremes you set yourself up for failure. Nothing is unrecoverable. Will you have to work backward a little to return to the point you were? Yes, BUT your efforts are never a total loss.  

A relevant quote I posted on Facebook that a friend told me … Life is like a camera, focus on what’s important, capture the good times, develop from the negatives, and if something doesn’t turn out, take another shot (try again)!


I strive to present everything I do in life in a meaningful and inspiring way. The yellow color of the hashtag is on purpose. I selected it to empower the words yearofyou because yellow is the color of the Solar Plexus Chakra, the Third Chakra of the body known as the Manipura. It is the center point in which all energy from the power of life and vitality flow throughout your entire body. It governs self-esteem, warrior energy/anger, and transformation and it controls digestion and metabolism.

Mental Core Exercise: Get some fresh air and meditate outside on a sunny day focusing on your breathing.

Physical Core Exercises: Anything that works your core or involves twisting — crunches, plank, twisted lunges, Boat Pose or Child’s Pose.

2019: Year of Transformation

Every December I set core fitness goals for the upcoming year to give me something to focus on and to plan my training. I also try to calculate expected financial costs because as fellow racers know, a year’s worth of race expenses adds up quickly. In addition to my main goals, I sprinkle in smaller events throughout the year as people tell me about them.

This year there’s an additional component to my plans. Yoga. In 2018, I completed a year of dedicated training to become a certified yoga teacher in both sculpt and power styles, and in December I proudly started teaching sculpt and flow at a yoga studio called Fierce Om. Jenny, the owner/manager, has been amazingly supportive as I strive to build up my client base and become the best teacher I can be.

Bev, my life coach, told me that she foresaw 2019 as being a transitive year for me. Typically, change makes me uneasy, but for some reason, I am very excited by this prospect of life transformation, and I’m going to carry it with me and trust in the journey ahead! 

The reason why I started Gal on the Go was to inspire girls and other women through my life examples, to take reasonable risks trying things outside of their comfort zones that would help them to lead healthy lives and discover what they are capable of in areas they never imagined!

Since 2014, when I entered my first race, the Virginia Spartan Super, I have learned a lot through trial and error and advice given to me by other racers. One thing you should never underestimate is the power of your mindset. Sure, physical training is essential, but your mindset can have a significant influence on your outcomes in life situations. Keeping your mindset in check when moments of uncertainty start to creep in is crucial. IF you find your head leading you down a path of doubt or negativity, I offer you these two things to help you push through …

  • A mantra … Mirror, mirror on the wall, I’ll always get up after I fall. And whether I run, walk, or have to crawl, I’ll set my goals and achieve them all!
  • A song (music is a great mind booster) … download and crank up DREAMER by Black Violin.

I promise that you can truly achieve anything you set your mind to combined with honest prep work. Every time during a race, defeating thoughts enter my mind at a grueling point and I have to focus hard to push them aside. I refuse to let those negative thoughts get the best of me. During those moments I tell myself STOP WITH THE SELF-SABOTAGE! I CANNOT FAIL, I WILL NOT FAIL! I may not finish exactly how I hope, BUT make no mistake, I will finish. I am naming 2019 the #yearofyou; get out there and do things that fulfill both your mind and your body!

So what’s coming up in 2019? Some cool stuff!!! Here’s a sneak peek.

YOGA EVENTS I’M LEADING

(NOTE: If you are seeking an enthusiastic yoga instructor for your event, email me at galotgo@gmail.com.)

DATE EVENT LOCATION
January 27 (Sun.)

 

 

Doggy Noses + Puppy Poses: Yoga Flow Class @10:30 a.m.
NOTE: Tickets SOLD OUT in two days!!! Thank you!
Mustang Sally Brewery, Chantilly, VA

 

February 9 (Sat.)

 

 

Athleta In-Store Sculpt Class @9:00 a.m.
Free and open to the public.
*bring your own weights
ATHLETA, Reston, VA

 

 

February 17 (Sun.)

 

New Year Transformative OmWorkshop: Nutrition + Restorative Yoga; Time: TBD Fierce Om, Chantilly, VA

 

??? ??? ???

RACES I’M PARTICIPATING IN

(NOTE: If you there is a race you think I should do or you are looking for a team member email me at galotgo@gmail.com with the details.)

DATE EVENT LOCATION
May 5 TD Five Boro Bike Tour (40 miles) NYC
August 17 SeaWheeze Half Marathon + Yoga Festival Vancouver, BC
??? ??? ???

I don’t have any financial sponsors yet for 2019, but I hope to have some soon. I was fortunate last year to have the support of Westfields Dental, Bitar Cosmetic Surgery Institute, Essence of Om, and Downs and Associates Insurance. If you are interested in becoming a sponsor of Gal on the Go, please email me at galotgo@gmail.com.

“Here’s to the dreamers! Yes, I’m a dreamer!”

– black violin

Limitless Possibilities

The Suddenly Single Show With The Danielle Daily

My talented friend Danielle, creator and dynamic host of the new podcast The Suddenly Single Show, is an expert at formulating ideas, tackling her dreams, and networking. She was recently looking for sponsors for her new show so I took a leap of faith and signed on. I believe that there are no limits to what we can achieve when we support each other’s endeavors!

[The Suddenly Single Show is THE inspirational podcast for people who find themselves, “Suddenly Single.” Divorce, death, separation, or good old-fashioned gettin’ dumped. Like it or not, sometimes you find yourself Suddenly Single.]

Be sure to check out Danielle’s podcast through her website, iTunes, Spotify, and more! The episodes are loaded with great insight from people of many walks of life.

Yogi योगी Insight (part 11 in a series)

If you are coming here for the first time, you have entered part 11 in an interview series with aspiring and experienced yogis called Yogi Insight. I hope that you enjoy each person’s shared journey. Namaste!

[I posted this latest edition of Yogi योगी Insight today, the 11th day of the 11th month in the 11th year at 11:00 a.m. because it’s considered the most powerful day in a century and I hope to spread enlightenment through this series! Each yogi has something of value to offer. The #Sanskirt word associated with today is Shambhala, meaning a space of peace, tranquility, and happiness. It’s seen as a time for bringing a wind of fresh change into your life and putting bad and tired feelings in the past.]

I first met Alyson, co-founder of WheelHouse Yoga, at a yoga festival when my omie Beverly and I were walking around and stopped at their booth. She introduced me to Alyson Pollard and Kelly Layfield. I instantly felt uplifted by their positive energy! Alyson part of the WheelHouse dynamic duo ownership juggles many roles and is hard to catch. I am thankful that she made time to sit down with me for a candid interview.

Alyson Pollard

Yogi: Alyson Pollard
Studio: WheelHouse Yoga

Q: How long have you been practicing yoga?
A: Knowingly and consistently for about 10 years.

Q: Who or what influenced you to take up yoga?
A: A knee injury. An overuse injury from running. I knew I needed to stretch more. I started my practice at Lifetime Fitness, and it was helpful. I was also going through some challenging life stuff at the time — a death, divorce. I thought, wait, yoga is more beneficial than just helping my knee!

Q: What aspect of practicing yoga do you like the most and why?
A: It depends on the day, but mindful meditation is hands-on my favorite! It’s something that even if I skip a day of Asana work (the physical practice of yoga), which is frequent as a studio owner, I don’t ever miss a day of meditation!

Q: What is your favorite style of yoga class to take and why?
A: Vinyasa. A challenging Vinyasa class because that’s when I’m able to be the most present — when I’m physically challenged.

Q: What is your favorite posture and why?
A: Wheel pose for sure! When Kelly and I opened the studio that’s one of the reasons why we called it WheelHouse, both of us are drawn to that posture. Starting a business wasn’t something we really planned to do, it just sort of kept evolving and happened. The word wheelhouse came up a lot. We were like what are we going to offer? What do we really want to do? We kept saying it’s in the wheelhouse of fitness, the wheelhouse of mindfulness. Then we thought why don’t we call it WheelHouse Mind Body Studio?! (That was the original name of the studio, now it’s WheelHouse Yoga.) We looked up the definition of the word wheelhouse — a yoga pose, your core, being in the sphere, which for us is being in the industry of fitness and mindfulness; and in baseball, it’s part of a batter’s strike zone most likely to produce a home run. There are so many meanings! We thought, this just works!

Q: How long have you been teaching yoga?
A: About four and a half years.

Q: Who or what influenced you to become a yoga teacher?
A: My personal yoga practice influenced me to become a yoga teacher. It helped me physically and emotionally with balance in my life. It motivated me to want to offer yoga to others because I found it to be such a great tool.

Q: What aspect of teaching yoga do you like the most and why?
A: 100% helping others! It’s cool to get someone into an arm balance that they’ve wanted to do, BUT way far beyond that, the stories of how people’s lives off the mat have been profoundly affected is what I like the most. Integrating into the mindfulness, the thoughts of benefiting others outside of ourselves. When you invite people to attend a class dedicated to someone else, it tends to be a very energetic class because you’re all working for the sake of another. I think that is my favorite shift to see within students.

Q: What is your favorite style of yoga class to teach and why?
A: A powerful Vinyasa class! I always allow at least 20 minutes for floor work and Savasana at the end. It’s good when you leave a class and feel like you’ve had a solid workout. Some people leave on that high, but if you can really take it down and contemplate at the end all of the insight you reflected on whether it’s physically, mentally, emotionally — that’s important.

Q: Why did you open a yoga studio?
A: Before opening the studio I was a special education teacher. I thought I was going to be able to balance both because I was an assistant teacher. I thought I can do this, then OK, I can’t do this. I quit my job in August with school starting only a month later. I had to do something with purpose! Before opening the studio, Kelly and I had taught a few classes together, I was already teaching private sessions and had personal training clients. She was doing the same with pilates. We always came together on yoga. We had been friends for about 10 years before opening the studio. We were planning one of our classes one day, and she said you know, there’s a place in Clifton that is available. I said, oh yeah? I kind of thought it may be fun, and I said YES! Kelly was like oh sh**, she said yes! Then I kind of pushed her down the hill — yep, we’re gonna do this, we’re gonna do this!

But that doesn’t tackle the why we opened the studio because I don’t think that part was as clear back then as it is now. In the beginning, it was more of there’s an opportunity let’s seize it. Despite all that was going on in my life at the time, I thought I could make this work. I had teacher training and retreats in mind from the start, but didn’t know it would all be what it is now. I was career driven in the beginning, but then quickly shifted to what a humbling opportunity it is to provide a place where people’s lives are so affected. That started happening pretty fast, which was incredible. It was all worth it! My gut told me you’re gonna be fine. It was one of those moments that I’m thankful for my family because in the beginning if I had gone to the bank to ask for the loan for the money I needed they would have said you’re funny, no, good luck! Fortunately, I was able to go to my parents for a loan. It was the same situation as a bank; I had to pay them back interest and all of that. My dad was like I believe you. It’s going to work, but you have to report the numbers to me every single month. I did that for the first 10 months, and he said OK, I see the trend, you’re fine. It was one of those things in life where I was like I believe this is going to work! It has to work! It was a feeling that I trusted.

Q: What are you most excited about as a studio owner and what are some challenges?
A: One thing that excites me is creativity. I don’t like to be complacent, but rather always evolving. I’ve had some other opportunities in the past where I was my own boss, got away from that and thought OK, I don’t really want to work for anybody else the rest of my life. Being an owner comes with its own set of challenges. You have to be accountable for yourself. Coming from a place of wanting to benefit the students in the most accessible way, that is what keeps me motivated more so than personal accountability. For example, I told students I would do this or I know this will benefit them, and this is what I’m going to do to make it happen. That is very important. Another challenge is financial. It’s always scary, but I must keep the strong faith that I had in the beginning — this is going to work and be OK. My only other challenge is because I have three kids and I’m a single mom, I have to juggle a lot. I would love to teach at the studio several times a week because I like the nighttime crowd, but that balance can be hard. Also, with nine instructors if they have a problem, that means I have a problem because as an owner I have to be the one who picks up the slack.

Q: Your studio offers a range of classes. How did you determine the types of classes you would have?
A: It was a challenge at the beginning for sure. When we first opened, we offered yoga, barre, pilates, HITT classes, everything, which is what we had to do to figure out what was going to stick. The Vinyasa yoga has definitely stuck. But I would say our most faithful crowd, besides the Saturday morning crowd, is Gentle Yoga. It’s so interesting because it’s not what I expected. The only day of the week we didn’t offer Gentle Yoga was on Thursday, but as of November 1st, it’s now offered every day of the week. It’s well attended because for instance — right now I’m personally nursing a hamstring injury and that class is really challenging. I think a lot of people come to it even if they are an advanced practitioner. Sometimes they’ll stay and take it as a second class to cool down, sometimes they’ll take it before another class, and it becomes their warm up to whatever class is next. I think we’ve definitely settled in now to what classes people like and what works for our community.

Q: What services do you offer beyond yoga classes?
A: Teacher training and retreats. The teacher training is when the teaching becomes exponential because you are producing other people that can go on and continue to share what beautiful shifts people can have in their bodies, minds, and hearts. That is an important part of why I got into yoga.

The retreats have been nothing short of magical — each one we have done. We go into them with the mindset of hey, we’re going to hit some bumps along the way, but we’ll figure things out. And we have every time! Many more retreats are on the horizon, which is something that I didn’t think would be such a big part of my yoga journey. I traveled and did the spring break thing in college. Now I travel healthy and balanced with a purpose! It’s been beautiful to see ho many people want to travel in that way — not just with their families, but with complete strangers. It’s a really neat experience! The first retreat I held for WheelHouse was local at the summer camp I went to growing up. It was very sentimental to me. Then Kelly and I did one about a month and a half after that in Mexico during Halloween time. That retreat was amazing, and I would do it again in a heartbeat!

Teacher training and retreats are 100% at the top for me. Even if I never taught another yoga class, I would absolutely still continue to do both of those things!

Q: Do you have a yoga mentor?
A: Yes, the people who I went through teacher training with at Stil Studio pretty much instantly became mentors. Our studio was open for some time before Kelly and I went through teacher training. I am forever grateful to Kelly. I was supposed to take a teacher training the month that we opened, but I pulled out. I was like I’m drowning, there’s no way! She told me that Stil Studio was coming to the Fairfax area from Boston to hold Fluid Yoga School. She said I really think you’re going to love these people! I probably said no to her 15 times. Then, about two days before the teacher training started I told Kelly, fine, I’ll go. It transformed my life in more ways than I ever expected! That’s when I found my meditation practice and everything changed. Stil Studio now comes here to conduct teacher training for WheelHouse and Kevan Gale leads it. They have been open for 10 years and have a lot more experience under their belt. They’ll tell us oh, we did that and it didn’t work, don’t do that. It’s been very helpful. I learned the compassion piece of teaching in this business through their training. That for me became the huge difference — seeing teachings delivered in a way that focused on building up the students instead of the teachers.

Q: What advice would you give to a new yoga teacher?
A: If you deliver teachings, touch with compassion, and connect with your students, it’s going to be OK even if they don’t love your flow or your music.

We get nervous about teaching. Are students going to like my class? Are they going to hate it? Well, the answer is both. Half of them will love your class and the other half may think that it sucks. You just have to know that you’re not going to be everyone’s cup of tea, and that’s OK!

YOGI योगी INSIGHT (part 10 in a series)

If you are coming here for the first time, you have entered part 10 in an interview series with aspiring and experienced yogis called Yogi Insight. I hope that you enjoy each person’s shared journey. Namaste!

I met Daniel a few years ago when one of his businesses, Jammin’ Java, hosted Jammin’ Yoga — a music-infused pop-up yoga series with proceeds to benefit Music Makes Life Better. I admire how Daniel pays it forward through his community organization, encouraging people to “serve their neighbors in need.” His pursuits align with all of my life passions — music, community, and yoga, so I was stoked when he carved out time to sit down with me and share his yoga path!

Daniel Brindley

Yogi: Daniel Brindley
Studio: Down Dog Yoga

Q: How long have you been practicing yoga?
A: Nine years. I started at a local gym setting, and then I went to Bikram Yoga in Tysons Corner and Reston for a while. After about year or so of that people kept saying you should try Down Dog, it’s hot yoga, but different from Bikram. I started coming to Down Dog about eight years ago.

Q: Who or what influenced you to take up yoga?
A: You know what, I was probably latching on to the trend. In around 2009/2010 I was on a personal journey to get healthy and looking for things to get myself healthy in every way. Yoga just really resonated with me. It kept working for me.

Q: What aspect of practicing yoga do you like the most and why?
A: It’s different from when I started. Now it’s very much body maintenance, staying healthy. With the busyness of life, especially with hot yoga, it’s very much a rinse. From looking at screens all day, email, phone, business, kids, and running around it’s a good way to show up, take a pause and get it all out. Rinse out and reset! That’s the way I think about it now. When I started, I was on a mission five days a week. It was very much a path to transforming my life and then becoming a teacher.

Q: What is your favorite style of yoga class to take and why?
A: The yoga that we do at Down Dog is called Baptiste Yoga™, power yoga. It’s hot yoga. It resonates with me — the sweat and heat. They are critical for me — I love it! It feels like more of a workout. There’s a vigorous side to it that I appreciate. Other yoga styles I have tried are fine, in my view, they are softer, calmer, slower, but I don’t get much of a workout. I don’t do it often, but I like Bikram yoga, it’s pretty special. The heat is amazing — it’s a very good counterbalance to Baptiste.

Q: What is your favorite posture and why?
A: I know what poses I don’t like, balance poses. Those poses can be tricky for me. I have a bad left ankle. In general, I find balancing poses challenging. I don’t know if I have a favorite — the way that the sequence is set up in Baptise, Wheel Pose is very much an apex/peak pose. Thinking back to my full history of yoga, I remember in my early days when they would call Wheel it was very challenging and very exhilarating every time. It was like whoa! I don’t have a favorite, but Wheel is definitely something that resonates with me.

Q: How long have you been teaching yoga?
A: Roughly four years, but I took a break. I taught a lot at the top and then I kind of burned out, took a break and then returned.

Q: Who or what influenced you to become a yoga teacher?
A: It felt inevitable to me. As I said, when I started yoga I wasn’t healthy. I wasn’t me really; I was a different person. It changed my whole outlook on everything. I got into immersions, training weekends away — it started feeding on itself. I did a teacher training with Baron Baptiste who started Baptiste Yoga™. I also trained with Patty Ivey, owner of Down Dog. I’ve always been that guy — a teacher, good communicator — I like sharing and being in front of people. I’ve always found it exhilarating. Then falling in love with yoga and seeing how transformational it is, it became a thing that was obviously going to happen. I remember questioning if I should go to trainings and spend the money, but I kept doing it and was inspired to teach. As soon as I finished the second training I was teaching a couple of weeks later. 

Q: What aspect of teaching yoga do you like the most and why?
A: I have never been into the fancy poses and dissecting them. It’s never been what I have been drawn to. It may be a guy thing; I’m not sure. For whatever reason, I’ve always just been more drawn to the simple straight ahead Baptiste style if it ain’t broke don’t fix it. I make subtle changes/tweaks to the sequence in my classes. Within that for me, what I’m most drawn to is the inspirational, transformational lesson — that’s what I mean by the non-pose part of yoga. That’s what keeps me going — sharing things I’ve learned with others. Also, I have a keen sense I realized. With yoga, if you give yourself to it — it can be a powerful transformational experience. I reference Christian faith in it in terms of being born-again. I feel like yoga, granted not a religion, I do see different people in the room having been saved or not saved by yoga. There’s something to that, again, not in a religious sense, but personal growth and transformational human story.  When I walk into my class, frankly I’m not focused on the seasoned people in the room. I’m not that guy who’s going to take them into crazy poses. When I see brand new people who don’t even know how to touch their toes — literally, there’s no reaction or response.  I notice that they’re a beginner and think, wow, I have the opportunity to show them how freakin’ amazing power yoga is and how their life can be impacted positively by the whole experience.   

Q: Do you feel your teaching style is different than others? Especially as a male instructor?
A: I do air on the preachy side, but I’m conscious of it. I’m very excitable. I like to go off and share. I can only teach once a week. I kind of wish I had the time to teach more because I want to share all this stuff. That’s my sort of style. I also think I’m good at getting people motivated. The momentum in my class is this train is moving, and there’s no lagging. It’s powerful and challenging. That’s what I want to do because that’s what I reacted to with yoga. It’s designed to be a highly physical practice. It’s supposed to be hot. It’s supposed to be vigorous. There’s a speed to the flow. I think I’m good at keeping people moving, sweating and being challenged.

Q: Do you feel the student’s perception of you is different as a male instructor? Your class is always jam-packed.
A: I think my class resonates with people. They’re getting the poses they need. I don’t complicate it. I think I have the wisdom to share that people are seeking. It’s the same thing that makes them buy self-help books, go to religious services, counselors, it’s all the same stuff — people are looking for guidance and growth. It’s a physical practice first definitely, and it’s a spiritual experience. Before I started yoga, it would go to the gym and workout and go to wherever else for spiritual stuff. It was all segmented, but in yoga, it’s all integrated. I think people keep coming back to my class because I’m very tuned into all of that. I’m not just mechanical pose-to-pose. I also bring in the spiritual elements. I think it’s kind of a holy sh** moment for some people. Wait, I thought I was just coming to workout. I think there’s something to that.

Q: Do you think your role as a father, businessman, etc. influence you as a teacher?
A: It’s the other way around. Doing yoga and teaching help me in different areas of my life. There’s an interplay, but yoga has definitely transformed how I look at problems, business, people, etc.
SIDE NOTE: Before the interview, I took Daniel’s class, and he talked about staying in the flow of life and the perception of letdowns and setbacks. There was a time in his life when he would have felt “the sky is falling” if crappy stuff happened, or things didn’t go as expected. But he has a different outlook now. He shifted from seeing those things as dead ends or problems to each one of the seaming roadblocks as the opposite — a sign of possibility. For instance, he said he went to go swimming for some self-care time and forgot his goggles. At first, he felt frustrated that he didn’t have them and could have said forget it and went home. Instead, he changed his mindset, grabbed a kickboard and did a different workout than he originally planned. Swimming laps with the kickboard and running in the water turned out to be equally if not more fun for him once he adapted to the situation.

Q: What advice would you give to a new yoga teacher?
A: There’s not a lot of money to be made in teaching yoga, at least at the local level. It’s very common for new teachers to burn out. They’re very excited and keep saying yes to teaching lots of classes, but they still have to work a full-time job. You can easily burn out and lose the excitement because of all the busyness. Also, you don’t think of this, but people who teach a lot have that much less time to spend in the studio and practice. There’s a sacrifice. You should be strategic with setting up your initial schedule to make sure it’s sustainable because burn out is real.

Q: What advice would you give to other males?
A: There is a perception out there that yoga is a woman’s thing, but it’s kind of funny because a lot of luminaries of yoga were male. Find a role model you can relate to. For instance, Baron Baptiste is a role model to me. I don’t know him, I’ve talked to him, but I don’t know him. I read his books, took his training and other things. I encourage other guys to practice yoga and consider teaching. If you’re a type A male, you probably think that you should be in the weight room and do CrossFit, but you really should be doing the opposite. You’re probably good at all that stuff, but the counterbalance to it is where you should be spending your time and energy. Yoga is where you’ll get the balance — the counterbalance to what you can naturally do.

Yogi योगी Insight (part 8 in a series)

If you are coming here for the first time, you have entered part 8 in an interview series with aspiring and experienced yogis called Yogi Insight. I hope that you enjoy each person’s shared journey. Namaste!

I met Shannon during sculpt teacher training. She is a smart and strong woman who is soft-spoken outside of the studio, but radiates with a commanding presence when she leads a class!  

shannon blog pic

Yogi: Shannon Yun
Studio: CorePower Yoga

Q: Who or what influenced you to take up yoga?
A: My first time doing yoga was through the Nike Training Club app. I came across the yoga program on the app and thought it would be very easy, but it wasn’t at all! I continued to do it and try to get better. Soon after, I started watching and following a yoga instructor on YouTube called Yoga by Candace. I used to struggle with doing her power yoga sequences. In the fall of 2016, I attended a yoga workshop she held in the area and I thought wow, this is easier! I became more confident in doing yoga and joined a studio to lose weight and tone up for my upcoming wedding.     

Q: How long have you been practicing yoga?
A: Since September 2015.

Q: What aspect of practicing yoga do you like the most and why?
A: I like how I feel after taking a yoga class. The same goes for other workouts I do such as lifting and Crossfit. All of them are hard while I’m doing them, except yoga is a little different because it challenges both my mind and body — when I’m done taking a class it puts me in a euphoric-like state.   

Q: What is your favorite posture and why?
A: I love forearm stand. When I first saw someone in the pose it seemed elusive to me. I thought I would never be able to do it. I practiced the posture for a very long time and suddenly one day it clicked and I was like wow, I can do this! I still enjoy doing forearm stand because I worked so hard to achieve it. I continue to practice the pose regularly at home and after class. I like staying after class to work on my form because I’m warm and forearm stand requires a lot of shoulder opening and core strength.       

Q: What aspect of practicing yoga do you find the most challenging and why?
A: Breath. I struggle taking full deep breaths. When you take a full deep breath you have to extend through your diaphragm and your belly. In a public setting, I don’t take full deep breaths because I’m distracted thinking my belly looks distended. It’s my own personal struggle and I’m trying to let go of that mentality. It’s very easy to take a deep breath and fill from your chest, but filling through your belly is different. I think that’s why I have I have back issues because my thoracic spine isn’t fully extending when I take breaths.

Q: What is most fulfilling to you in your yoga practice?
A: It’s a tie between strength and flexibility. I love being able to accomplish the forearm stand, which requires strength and flexibility. However, my number one wish through yoga is to have open hamstrings, that would be my dream. I admire people who can fold their chest to their legs in forward fold. I have made progress over the past few years in reaching my toes and having a flatter spine in seated, standing and wide-legged forward fold which is fulfilling.

Q: How long have you been teaching yoga and who influenced you to become a teacher?
A: I’ve been teaching since March 2018. Tatiana, the manager of CorePower, where I practice influenced me to become a teacher. I was taking a lot of sculpt classes and I knew that I wanted to take teacher training, but I wasn’t sure which style class I wanted to pursue. She encouraged me to take sculpt teacher training and then at the end assess where I want to go from there.

Q: What aspect of teaching yoga sculpt do you like the most and why?
A: I love creating interesting sequences that include poses that challenge people to try something new. I aim to make my classes difficult, BUT doable. For example, this week in class I incorporated power push-ups, where you lift both of your palms off the mat. It’s a move that most people would never try on their own. Seeing people attempt an exercise they wouldn’t normally try because they feel safe in my class is great!

Q: How are weight training moves beneficial to yoga practice?
A: Strength is very important in yoga — when you combine strength and flexibility it helps prevent you from overextending your muscles. Yoga sculpt combines those two elements, which is one reason why I like the format so much. Take backbends for instance, if you have a really flexible spine you can overextend your back. What keeps you from doing that are your core muscles. A strong core will help you do backbends safely. Also, when it comes to increasing strength it’s smart to mix up and progressively add on when incorporating weights. Your muscles adapt to your physical activity. Doing a variety of poses with various weights is taxing on your central nervous system and challenges your body so that your muscles don’t become stagnant.

Q: Is there one exercise that you always include in your sequence?
A: Yes, planks because they are a full body movement that can be done in various ways that present new challenges. I incorporate four to five different plank exercises in my sequences to awaken various body parts.

Q: What advice would you give to a new yoga teacher?
A: Be confident! If you feel nervous tell yourself I have the skills and knowledge, I can do this! Squash any self-doubt or thoughts of making mistakes or you risk fulfilling those expectations. Instead, think to yourself, I’m awesome! That attitude will come through and be apparent to others and they will, in turn, think wow, that was a great class! Confidence is everything, but not in an egotistical way, rather you are valuable and you have something to share with others.

Also, whether you’re a student or a teacher, take different styles of classes. Never be afraid to try other exercises — there’s so much you can benefit from if you have an open mind to learning new things. Even if it’s discovering a fresh way to cue something by participating in another teacher’s class.

The sky is the limit for Shannon and I cannot wait to see what new heights she takes herself and her students!