Yogi योगी Insight (part 7 in a series)

If you are coming here for the first time, you have entered part 7 in a series about aspiring and experienced yogis’ journeys. I hope that you enjoy it and follow along. Namaste!

I met Nat, a kind spirit, in the tea room of YYOGA after a Flow class while on travel in Vancouver, BC. We started chatting and I learned that Nat is from West Sussex, England. Also, she’s a huge dog lover, so I knew she was cool. Nat shared her personal story with me of why she got into yoga, and I asked her if I could interview and feature her in Yogi Insight. I am excited that she said yes!

Nat

Yogi: Nat Joos
Studio: In-home private practice

Q: Who or what influenced you to take up yoga?
A: I read articles about runners getting fewer injuries through stretching out in a yoga class. I was a big runner 15 years ago, doing 10Ks about five times a day. Yoga was important in assisting my body in the amount of running I was doing. Then, yoga became my constant companion after I lost my husband to skin cancer five years ago. I turned to yoga drenched in grief and yoga transcended me to a place where I felt nourished with a sense of acceptance and peace. It presented itself in a positive way, and I’ve never forgotten that.

Q: How long have you been practicing yoga?
A: I have been practicing for about 15 years.

Q: What aspect of practicing yoga do you like the most and why?
A: I love the way yoga makes me feel. I can unplug from the past and future and just be present on my mat. It feels wonderful!

Q: What aspect of yoga do you like the least and why?
A: This is hard to answer … I guess it’s certain postures I find the hardest. I have relatively tight hamstrings, so forward bends are not textbook for me. I believe that it’s not about how far you go into a posture, it’s about how you feel when you arrive!

Q: What is your favorite posture and why?
A: My favorite posture is side plank, just like the one in my photo. It makes me feel calm and very strong!

Q: How long have you owned a private yoga practice?
A: I’ve owned my own practice for just over a year and love it! My Yoganat classes are in the comfort of my own home shala, which creates a more personable practice experience. It’s important to me to keep the authenticity of yoga by sealing every class with an Om to deepen the practice.

Q: What is your favorite part about teaching yoga and why?
A: I like to offer a practice that’s for everyone and I open my doors with a big friendly welcome! If you’re lucky, you get to meet my furry kid “Minnie the choccy lab!” Unfortunately, she’s unable to attend the sessions because she’s a distraction.

Q: What advice would you give to a new yoga teacher?
A: Give it time and be patient. Also, be yourself.

To read more about Nat, check out her website YOGANAT!

Yogi योगी Insight (part 6 in a series)

If you are coming here for the first time, you have entered part 6 in a series about aspiring and experienced yogis’ journeys. I hope that you enjoy it and follow along. Namaste!

I met Elena two years ago when I walked into her HPF class. I instantly felt at peace by her soothing voice and her nurturing spirit! I never experienced an immediate calming reaction to a person like that before. I returned and took Elena’s class whenever possible. She is both a life coach and a yoga teacher, two roles that could not fit a person more perfectly!   

Elena Sonnino, life coach and yoga teacher

Elena Sonnino, life coach and yoga teacher

Yogi: Elena Sonnino
Studios: Beloved Yoga, Wheelhouse Yoga, and in-home private practice

Q: Who or what influenced you to take up yoga?
A: I never really liked yoga, other than when I was pregnant with my daughter. I had a difficult time being still in Savasana. Then one day, I started to feel and appreciate the benefits of it for the first time during a hiking and weight-loss retreat in British Columbia. I returned home with a DVD from the instructor. For a year or so I only used that DVD and sought out classes when I was on travel – until I found a local studio to regularly practice. The big shift for me came when I stopped focusing on yoga as a workout and embraced it as a daily practice.

Q: How long have you been practicing yoga?
A: I am a baby yogini. I practiced the physical asanas when I was pregnant in 2004 and then started to cultivate a practice in 2014. It wasn’t until 2016 that it became part of my everyday life. My first introduction to yoga was hatha style, then power vinyasa, and eventually I found my way to yin yoga and even Kundalini yoga.

Q: What aspect of practicing yoga are you most passionate about and why?
A: Yoga offers me a mirror whether I am studying, focusing on pranayama, or moving my body with asana – to unearth and attune to what is within me. Pema Chodron wrote, “Nothing ever goes away until it has taught us what we need to know.”

The idea that our body and our deepest self, come to us as benevolent messengers, inviting us to recognize and learn what we need to know is the essence of yoga for me, whether it is vinyasa, yin, or even kundalini. It is a practice that invites us to explore and reveal that which is hidden. It is an opportunity to notice that what is practiced is also reflected. It is a practice that focuses on and highlights self-compassion instead of self-improvement.

Q: What keeps you coming back to your mat?
A: My mat is one of my best teachers for acceptance. My mat reminds me that each day is a new day, and what happened the day before or what may happen the next day doesn’t really matter. Each practice allows me to notice the shifts in my balance — the subtle ways my body reacts, and the deeper qualities of my breath from one day to another.

Q: What aspect of practicing yoga do you find most challenging and why?
A: Challenge looks different on different days. In the early days of my vinyasa practice, approaching inversions and arm balances felt like my biggest challenge. I was insecure about my own strength and it was hard to detach from the outcomes when it felt like everyone around me made it look so easy. Aparigraha, non-attachment, in general, is an aspect of yoga that is both my favorite and perhaps most challenging. Even when I believe that I’ve approached a moment with curiosity and willingness, one of my daily practices is to notice and observe sensations, emotions, and thoughts so that I can catch myself when subtle attachments to expectations creep up.

Another aspect that has been challenging, is creating an at home practice for myself as a daily tool. Even though I know that yoga is more than the physical shapes we take on a mat, it took me a long time to allow myself to explore diverse styles and practices at home and tune in to what I needed rather than following the herd.

Q: What is most fulfilling for you in your yoga practice?
A: Connection to my inner source is what is most fulfilling for me in my practice. Sometimes that comes through breath work, sometimes it finds me in a shape on the mat, and sometimes it finds me in meditation. It is during those moments that I feel connected to something deeper and I can feel the energy in my body that makes my heart smile. I smiled a lot the first time I flew in crow pose or went upside down, supported by a wall.

Q: How long have you been teaching yoga? Who or what influenced you to become a teacher?
A: I completed my teacher training and started guiding practices in 2016. The thing that drew me to want to teach was my life coaching practice. In my own self-work, I’d integrated so much of what I knew as a life coach with my personal yoga practice and I wanted a way to bring the two together. I had been an elementary school teacher for 12 years, and there is something about being a guide and facilitator that energizes me, so the symbiotic relationship felt like a perfect way for me to blend my strengths and passions.

Q: What is your favorite aspect of teaching yoga and why?
A: Creating and holding space for practitioners to have their own experience with their body, their breath, and their mat. I consider myself a guide more than a teacher and like to invite individuals in my yin and vinyasa classes to attune to the inner strength and wisdom that is always within them.

Q: What is your least favorite aspect of teaching yoga and why?
A: When I first started teaching, my own practice changed. At first, it was hard for me to find time for my own practices, and then even when I did make it to my mat it felt like a part of me was always considering how the practice could inform my role as a teacher. It took a while, and to some degree, a change in the style of physical asana to help me ground into a practice that felt sustainable and nourishing just for me.

Q: What piece of advice would you give to a new yoga teacher?
A: Find the time and commit to your own practice. Be willing to explore and to study, to ask questions and look for answers within the sacred texts and in yourself.

Q: Who or what influenced you to become a life coach?
A: I’d always been a guide, asking questions and holding space for others. It was insights over time ranging from my experience surviving Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, my work as a classroom teacher, divorce, marathon running, learning to surf, and eventually, a chance encounter and experience with a massage therapist in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, and a paragliding experience that same weekend that brought everything together. Soaring through the air with the birds, attached to my co-pilot, I noticed how it only took subtle movements to change direction – and knew! It wasn’t about a destination as we flew. It was about noticing. It was about letting the wind move us and fully experiencing each shift with gratitude and wonder. By the time I reached the landing zone, I had decided to embrace the nudges and set off to find a training program to study with, and claim my role as a life coach!

Q: How long have you been a life coach? What is your favorite aspect of being a life coach?
A: I trained with the Martha Beck Institute in 2016 and I have worked with clients one-on-one and groups since that same year. I have spoken with a variety of groups and led workshops and retreats, which always energizes me. My favorite aspect is when a client tunes in to an inner realization based on a question that I asked or an invitation that I offered. Being a witness to my clients as they show up for themselves with vulnerability and willingness is like a gift.

Q: How does being a life coach tie into your yoga practice and being a yoga teacher?
A: The two are very symbiotic to me. I try to create experiences whether they are yoga or coaching related that invite individuals to connect with themselves. The ideas or themes that I find myself exploring with my clients are the same ones that I offer as intentions in my classes and for myself in my own practice.

BONUS ROUND 😃:  Do you have any exciting projects in the works?
A: I am launching a new podcast called Sunrise in Your Pocket on October 8. Everyone needs a nudge now and then to help them get back on track to feeling joyful, vibrant, and alive in the now. Sunrise in Your Pocket is your weekly podcast for playful, easy to implement guidance for reconnecting to the inner strength and wisdom within you. You can sign up here to the be the first to know when it goes live!

EVENT: Join Elena for an in-person workshop at Beloved Yoga on Saturday, November 3 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. to stop fixing and start living! Click here for more info. 

Yogi योगी Insight (part 5 in a series)

If you are coming here for the first time, you have entered part 5 in a series about aspiring and experienced yogis’ journeys. I hope that you enjoy it and follow along. Namaste!

I met Danielle about a year ago in a C2 class at CorePower Yoga. She was deep in her relax zone before class, but we spoke afterward and we have been buds ever since. She is an amazing woman who used her private practice experience on her mat to launch and pave a path of inspiration off her mat. Danielle’s credentials include TEDx speaker, author, host of The Danielle Daily Show, just to name a few! I am grateful that she made time to participate in this series.

Danielle Watson

Yogi: Danielle Watson, E-RYT 200
Studio: Private Practice

Q: Who or what influenced you to take up yoga?
A: Massive anxiety. I took up yoga in graduate school as an attempt to save myself from spontaneously combusting from the stress of it. I remember lying on my bed crying at night because it felt like I could not find the off button for my brain. Even in my sleep I was thinking and worrying, which led me to feel tired and anxious all the time. I was already physically flexible but heard that yoga was good for calming the mind, so I decided to give it a try to relieve some of the pressure I was feeling.

Q: How long have you been practicing yoga?
A: I started in 2002, so 16 years now!

Q: What aspect of practicing yoga are you most passionate about?
A: Svadhyaya (self-study) and tapas (discipline). For me, these are the two keys to developing into the person we want to become. Asana practice is something I do most days of the week, but practicing these two niyamas is something that I am committed to working on every moment of the day.

Q: What keeps you coming back to your mat?
A: My asana practice is like a great big cosmic dumpster where I go to dispose of my mental garbage. Often times, when I walk into the studio I feel spectacularly human … vulnerable, anxious, or just plain not in a good mood. My mat is a space where I can safely unload the emotional burden of my humanity whether it happens to be sadness, loneliness, grief, anxiety, or shame. I walk out of the studio feeling lighter, freer and ready to keep marching toward becoming the woman I was meant to be! I like to practice daily when possible because, for me, yoga is the mental health equivalent of brushing my teeth. I love the clean feeling!

Q: What is most challenging for you in your personal yoga practice?
A: Letting go of judgment. I often find myself critiquing how others teach, especially when it comes to what is safe and unsafe for new students. I have to remind myself that it’s none of my business anymore!

Q: What is most fulfilling for you in your personal yoga practice?
A: Seeing my practice grow and change. My practice is a lot like bamboo … so much happens beneath the surface before you can see what has been developing, and then suddenly new abilities come bursting out!

Q: Who or what influenced you to start a private yoga teaching business?
A: I started out teaching classes at a studio, but quickly realized that the pay was not very good. I knew that I could work fewer hours and make more money if I started offering private sessions. Also, I  really liked having a close relationship with my students and offering an in-home practice often led to me becoming a part of a family.

Q: Why did you decide to stop your private yoga business?
A: I decided to stop teaching yoga when I realized I was meant to do something more with my gifts and talents than what I was currently doing. It was a difficult decision for me because my clients loved me and I felt guilty about giving up something that helped so many people so much. I finally decided to stop and give away all of my yoga books and gear when I answered an important question for myself. That question was, “If I can do this much good with something I know I am no longer meant to be doing, how much good could I do with something I am meant to be doing?” I knew the good that I was meant to do was a lot more and that sealed the decision for me.

Q: How long did you teach yoga?
A: About eight or nine years.

Q: What insight do you have for someone thinking about starting a private yoga business?
A: All you really need to get started is an extra mat, a strap, and some blocks. It’s tempting to buy a bunch of nifty yoga props, but work with your clients first and then buy more equipment later as you determine the specific need(s) of your clients. Often, students have/want their own equipment so they can use it at home so you may not need to buy fancy props because they will buy on their own what you recommend.

Q: What piece of advice do you have for a new yoga teacher?
A: I don’t think new teachers often realize how much anxiety new students have about being in a yoga class. People are worried that they won’t fit in because they are not flexible, don’t know the poses, etc. I think it’s important to give a voice to that fear at the beginning of an intro class by saying something like, “If you’re here for the first time today, congratulate yourself for being brave! You’re not going to know how to do all the postures today, but you’re not expected to. After you’ve been here a few times you’ll get the hang of it and see yourself starting to improve. I’m proud of you for giving this a try!”

Yogi योगी Insight (part 4 in a series)

If you are coming here for the first time, you have entered part 4 in a series about aspiring and experienced yogis’ journeys. I hope that you enjoy it and follow along. Namaste!

I met Katie through Power Yoga Teacher Training. We became friends and shortly after she said: “I’m going to call you Kimbo, do you mind?” I liked the playful spirit of Katie’s intention and was like, alright! Now, whenever I hear “hey Kimbo” I know instantly that it’s her and it makes me smile. Take note of Katie’s name because she has a natural gift for teaching yoga and I’m confident that as she continues to hone her skills, she will make her mark in the yoga world!

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Yogi: Katie O’Donnell
Future Studio: CorePower Yoga

Q: Who or what influenced you to take up yoga?
A: I started practicing yoga in college in North Carolina when my friend Laure Bongiorno recommended it to me. I played collegiate soccer and I was dealing with an injury at the time that left me with fairly limited workout options. Laure recommended hot power vinyasa as a way for me to stretch and to get a good sweat. I attended a few classes with her, sweated a lot, loved it and decided to sign up for a membership!

Q: How long have you been practicing yoga?
A: I have been practicing yoga on and off for about five years, but I became serious about it and more committed to the practice two years ago.

Q: What aspect of practicing yoga are you most passionate about?
A: When I first started practicing yoga I was most aware and passionate about the physical benefits. I liked the way it made my body feel and I could see tangible changes in my physicality. As my practice grew over the years, my passion shifted more toward the mental benefits of yoga. I feel more at ease, open-minded and confident when I practice regularly. I find that just an hour on my mat helps me to let go of any negative feelings I may be having and it helps me to process other feelings in a more rational and sensible manner. I have more patience, for myself and for others, and a deeper understanding of my daily thoughts and feelings.

Q: What is most challenging for you as a yogi?
A: Meditation. It is something that I have wanted to incorporate into my daily routine and practice for a while, but I haven’t quite been able to. I think I need a jumping off point, some guided meditation resources to start the process nice and slow, and of course actively setting aside time daily to meditate.

Q: What is most fulfilling for you as a yogi?
A: So far it has been sharing with others how accessible yoga can be to everyone! Yoga looks and feels different for every individual. For some it may be studio time, for others, it may be yoga at a gym, or privately practicing at home. Every pose can be modified in some way to make it achievable and often times themes resonate with many individuals. It’s fun to dedicate an hour or so to your well-being — mentally and physically; we all need that! The sense of accessibility is something I aim to bring into my own classes to help make every student feel that they are comfortable, confident and safe on their mat.

Q: Why did you take Power Yoga Teacher Training?
A: I decided to take PYTT because I wanted to deepen my yoga practice. I wanted to uncover something within myself; find a passion, learn something new, and connect with wonderful like-minded individuals. I also wanted to bring more consistency into my practice. I tend to fluctuate in how much I take a class. One week I’ll go five times, then not attend for three weeks, come back for two days after that, etc. I needed a commitment from myself that I was willing to put myself and my practice first for eight weeks consistently.

Q: You just graduated from 200-hour PYTT, what is your short-term plan? What is your long-term plan?
A: Ideally, my short-term plan is to audition to become an instructor for CorePower Yoga this fall. Long-term I’m not entirely sure. It’s exciting that opportunities for yoga instructors continue to increase as awareness of the benefits of the practice grow. It would be fun to experiment with options in terms of private practice offerings. I think one thing I can say with certainty is that I am interested in starting some sort of free community class or getting involved with locations that offer that. Yoga is for everyone and I want to help bring it to as many individuals as possible!

Yogi योगी Insight (part 3 in a series)

If you are coming here for the first time, you have entered part 3 in a series about aspiring and experienced yogis’ journeys. I hope that you enjoy it and follow along. Namaste!

I heard through the yoga grapevine at CorePower that Jenn was a great teacher and I had spoken with her a few times at the front desk. One evening, I decided to take her C2 class and the rest is history! She became one of my favorite instructors, a friend, a mentor, and one of the leaders of my Power Yoga Teacher Training (PYTT) program.

Yogi: Jenn Price
Studio: CorePower Yoga, Fairfax

Q: Who or what influenced you to take up yoga?
A: I had just moved back to the east coast. I was at home transitioning from a corporate job to being a new mom. Once I was able to have some free time I started attending a yoga studio within walking distance of my house. I was looking to get back into a physical activity and wanted an hour of time to myself. I started off with Hatha yoga. I liked it because it felt really good on my postpartum body. I had always been very athletic and the class made me feel like I was accomplishing something. I immediately found myself wanting to go back more and more. I liked doing something just for myself. Later on, I took a Power Vinyasa class led by Jaimis Huff. It was the first Power Vinyasa class I had ever taken and it knocked me off of my *ass! I was like that does not qualify as yoga! I didn’t return to her class for a long time. Jaimis ended up being one of my biggest mentors and a friend that I still reach out to today for guidance.

Q: How long have you been practicing yoga?
A: I took my very first yoga class in February 2015 — the Hatha yoga class.

Q: What aspect of practicing yoga are you most passionate about?
A: I love the challenge of arm balances, backbends and inversions. For me, one of the juicy detoxifying aspects is to be able to slow down and treat myself inside and out.

Q: How long have you been teaching yoga?
A: Since April 2016. I did my Teacher Training at CorePower, but I had never practiced at CorePower before I did Teacher Training there. I reached out to the CorePower corporate office in Denver to inquire about training opportunities. I was connected with Liv, the studio manager at the time. The first class I took at CorePower was Liv’s C2 class. I loved that CPY Teacher Training was intensive. CPY’s programs are unique because the number of classes they require is definitely a lot heavier than other places.

Q: What is your mission as a yoga teacher?
A: I hope that everyone leaves with a deeper sense of connection to themselves. I want people to feel gratitude for who they are and that they are supported. I want my classes to be inspiring so that people feel energized and a sense of accomplishment, but more importantly, awareness for how truly strong they are. I know my classes provide physical challenges, but it’s also about breaking down mental walls that we create for ourselves and thinking in our heads that we can’t do something.

Q: What aspect of teaching yoga are you most passionate about?
A: It’s similar to what I’m passionate about in my practice — striving to teach self-love through an understanding of what happens on our mat, what we can and cannot do and how that translates in our life. I want people to know that they can come to the mat as they are raw, broken and messy and that there are no expectations. I want them to learn through their yoga practice that the love for themselves if it’s not already there, can grow from an awareness of who they are, what they want to be — experience growth on their mat.

Q: What is most challenging for you as a teacher?
A: The constant pressure I put on myself to create innovative sequences that continue to turn it up and take it to the next level for students is a challenge. I realize that I put that pressure on myself. It’s the same as in my own practice — I have expectations of what I want to do and I’m always having to remind myself that it’s not about the postures.

Q: What is most fulfilling for you as a teacher?
A: The friendships and connections that I have made with students. It’s important that I always teach from my heart and what feels right for my body. It’s a big chance you take when you put something like yoga that is sacred and personal to you and share it, hoping that others feel the same. The CPY community has been so accepting and supportive of me and my teaching — embracing my sequences and my mentality of yoga off the mat. Knowing that students resonate with what I teach and the life lessons that I share is awesome! It’s what links us together and is the whole point of yoga.

Q: How do you come up with your themes/intentions? Your sequences?
A: My themes are always related to something that is going on in my life or a conversation that I had recently with someone in my class, a friend or family member. It’s important to me that the themes I share are authentic so that I’m connected to what I say. I think that’s how it translates to something genuine and more importantly, impactful. Someone recently commented to me that it always seems like I am speaking from my heart. I replied I am. I hope to inspire my students, and if I’m sharing personal stories of what’s going on in my life I’m allowing the energy of our class to uplift me in return — it’s a reciprocity, coming full circle.

In regard to sequences, I always strive to pick an area of practice that allows students of all levels to have something to work on when they show up to take a class. It can be a focus on a specific part of the body, a particular part of yoga like backbends, inversions Ayurveda (holistic healing), or the moon cycle. Sometimes it can be based on one of my student’s requests — if they have something specific they really want to work on. At the end of the day when you come to my class, you know that you are going to get a good flow, some drills to strengthen for arm balances and inversions.

Q: What is some advice you have for a new yoga instructor?
A: Always teach to what feels right in your body and what speaks/radiates from your own heart. Also, try not to fall into the teacher’s curse of losing sight of your own practice. Make time to stay committed to your practice. It doesn’t have to be a studio class — it can be cultivating a home or self-practice. Keep some time sacred for yourself!

Yogi योगी Insight (part 2 in a series)

If you are coming here for the first time, you have entered part 2 in a series about aspiring and experienced yogis’ journeys. I hope that you enjoy it and follow along. Namaste!

I met Gina in college up north when I was working at an alternative rock radio station. I looked up to her and thought she was very cool, which still holds true today! Fast-forward a few years (alright, more than a few years  :/ ) I learned that Gina became a yoga instructor with a faithful following.

Gina Galli

Photo by Gina Galli

Yogi: Gina Galli
Studios: Antigravity Yoga Lab in Emmaus, PA | Steel Fitness in Bethlehem, PA | The Center for Better Bones

Q: Who or what influenced you to take up yoga?
A: 
Yoga has been in and out of my life for several years. My first so-called “yoga experience” came when I was in college and I was taking a Modern Dance class and the instructor said today we are going to do yoga. I thought it was kind of weird, but I sort of like how I felt afterward. I don’t think I did yoga again until I was in my mid-20s when I went to Sedona, Arizona, with my brother and we took a yoga class. I remember having a strong spiritual and euphoric feeling. In my 30s I took a regular yoga class when I started competing in long-distance road cycling events. The trainer and another friend recommended hot power yoga classes as part of my training. I started to incorporate a Baptiste Style practice and I fell in love with the physical aspects of yoga.

Q: How long have you been practicing yoga?
A: I would say regularly for about 14 years.

Q: You shared through social media that you have a new beautiful dedicated yoga space in your home. Who or what influenced you to create it?
A: I was teaching a couple of private yoga students. My boyfriend decided we were going to finish our basement and that he wanted to build a small yoga space for me so that I could teach private sessions and small classes.

Q: How long have you been teaching yoga?
A: I have been teaching yoga since 2012 and AntiGravity (Ariel yoga) for a year and a half.

Q: What is your favorite style of yoga to teach?
A: I love teaching very physical, sweaty hot yoga classes. I’m trained in Hatha yoga and I love when I have the opportunity to connect a physical practice with the more spiritual side of yoga. However, AntiGravity is a totally different experience altogether. It’s my “playtime” where I get to feel freedom in my body in no other way I can feel it in any other place in my life. ex. aerial yoga/silks

Q: What is your mission as a yoga teacher?
A: My mission as a teacher is for my students to move in ways physically and mentally in which they feel stronger — empowered to move through fears and/or anything that may be holding them back. I love when one of my students says “I got what I didn’t even know I needed” out of your classes. I am blessed to be able to pursue my passion for yoga and help people in my professional job. I work for Dr. Susan Brown, a nutritionist, and we treat clients who have low bone density and bone health conditions like Osteoporosis. Yoga is a form of exercise they can do to help stretch, strengthen and build stronger bones. They are fearful and my mission is to help them overcome their fear. In addition, I want to connect, create and be part of an amazing community of like-minded people through yoga.

Q: What aspect of teaching yoga are you most passionate about?
A: The healing benefits of yoga — when students come to a class and they are physically struggling through illness or an injury and they find relieve and release through the teachings.

Q: What aspect of practicing yoga are you most passionate about?
A: I love how yoga can be ever changing. I personally embrace the spiritual journey of yoga and incorporate components of it into my daily life. I read the Yamas and Niyamas often and try to stay true to Patanjali’s eightfold path.

Q: What is most challenging for you as a teacher?
A: I am devoted to teaching yoga and I look forward to every opportunity I have to lead a class. It is a privilege and an honor. When the room is filled I shine, but those moments where nobody shows up to class or you have one person and then you never seem them again are rough. I try not to let it get me down or take it personally. Even if I only have one person in my class, I make sure that one person gets the best class!

Q: What is most fulfilling for you as a teacher?
A: Seeing a yoga room filled with students and then at the end when they come and talk with me and share how they feel is great. It is very rewarding to know that you were able to provide your students with a release, relive and relaxation. I love teaching yoga — the helping and healing aspects fill my cup!

Q: How do you come up with your themes, intentions, sequences?
A: I consider myself a continuous student in developing my own self. I’m always reading, journaling and studying. I often bring my studies into class for themes. I have a life coach and we talk about many areas of development and she often inspires my teachings.

Q: Where do you see yourself in 5 or 10 years in the discipline of yoga?
A: I hope to still be teaching. I’m 50 years old and I have some limitations and injuries that do not allow me to move in ways I did in my 40s. My personal goal is to stay active into my 90s! I started teaching at retreats with Dr. Susan Brown and focusing on the many benefits of yoga for the aging body. In the fall we will roll out the Better Bones Exercise Evolution channel where you can subscribe to our videos on Better Bones Exercise Evolution. I’m looking to expand and travel to help women age gracefully and comfortably, and inspire them to keep moving!

Yogi योगी Insight (part 1 in a series)

Last year, I decided to deepen my yoga practice and sign up for a Yoga Sculpt Teacher Training. I completed the five-week course and earned my certification. Then an opportunity came along to take it a step further and work toward my 200-hour teacher training certification, which ends in two weeks. I have had the honor of meeting many amazing yogis, each with different levels of experience and intriguing backgrounds. Eternally curious, I thought it would be fun to interview the yogis to learn from them, apply their wisdom to my teaching and share the love, light and knowledge I gain from them along the way! I hope that you enjoy this special series. Namaste!

I met Lauren a few years ago as a fellow student in an afternoon sculpt class. We instantly hit it off!

Lauren Lipton

Photo by Lauren Lipton https://www.ellethreephotography.com/

Yogi: Lauren Lipton
Studio: Down Dog Yoga

Q: How long have you been practicing yoga?
A: I began practicing yoga in 2011 and it became embedded in my lifestyle ever since. It was a good counter to the Crossfit I was doing as well.

Q: Who or what influenced you to take up yoga?
A: I was working at Lululemon in Clarendon and as part of the job, we were influenced to practice yoga. I stumbled across Down Dog Yoga in Georgetown and was hooked ever since!

Q: How long have you been teaching yoga?
A: I have been teaching yoga since 2015; initially at my old Crossfit gym and now at Down Dog Yoga in Herndon.

Q: What is your mission as a yoga teacher?
A: To help people transform their lives and to see the possibilities that open up when we step on our mat. Our mats are a reflection of the world and how we interact and respond. I love seeing people grow on their mat and taking risks to become stronger.

Q: What aspect of teaching yoga are you most passionate about?
A: I love the breath work involved in Baptiste yoga. The deep breathing gives way to a deep-rooted moving meditation that really shakes up the core and transfers energy. I always feel at ease and calmer after I practice.

Q: What is most challenging for you as a teacher?
A: I would say the most challenging aspect of teaching is holding the energy in the room. There is no music in the class to carry on poses and for people to drift away. I am a guide who continually leads people to their breath to stay in their body and away from the chatter in the mind.

Q: What is most fulfilling for you as a teacher?
A: I love when people keep showing up to do the work!

Q: How do you come up with your sequences?
A: I follow a sequence derived from Baron Baptiste, called “Journey Into Power.”

Q: Where do you see yourself in 5 or 10 years in your yoga practice?
A: I will continue to practice this type of yoga — the heat is such a heart opener and power vinyasa helps heal injuries I have and keeps me strong.

Lauren is also a talented freelance photographer. Check out her website: 
https://www.ellethreephotography.com/